Neighborhoods

We welcome any questions you may have about buying or selling your new home. Feel free to contact us through the contact info below or the form on this page.

 

T: 416.483.8000
E: JEN@JEND.CA

Etobicoke

Originally part of Etobicoke, Alderwood was “disconnected” from the township with the coming of the QEW in the 1930s; likewise, its ties to Long Branch and New Toronto to the south were checked by the railway that cut through. As such, the neighbourhood has remained relatively insular throughout its growth. But, those who own the low-rise, single-family dwellings are loyal, and they now enjoy fantastic amenities, such as the Alderwood Centre, which houses a community pool, a library and an after-school childcare centre. Alderwood is native for “place where the alder trees grow,” and a fighting spirit to keep the neighbourhood vital—and to care for their own future—seems ingrained in its residents.

Your content goes here. Edit or remove this text inline or in the module Content settings. You can also style every aspect of this content in the module Design settings and even apply custom CSS to this text in the module Advanced settings.

Your content goes here. Edit or remove this text inline or in the module Content settings. You can also style every aspect of this content in the module Design settings and even apply custom CSS to this text in the module Advanced settings.

Originally part of Etobicoke, Alderwood was “disconnected” from the township with the coming of the QEW in the 1930s; likewise, its ties to Long Branch and New Toronto to the south were checked by the railway that cut through. As such, the neighbourhood has remained relatively insular throughout its growth. But, those who own the low-rise, single-family dwellings are loyal, and they now enjoy fantastic amenities, such as the Alderwood Centre, which houses a community pool, a library and an after-school childcare centre. Alderwood is native for “place where the alder trees grow,” and a fighting spirit to keep the neighbourhood vital—and to care for their own future—seems ingrained in its residents.

Your content goes here. Edit or remove this text inline or in the module Content settings. You can also style every aspect of this content in the module Design settings and even apply custom CSS to this text in the module Advanced settings.

Your content goes here. Edit or remove this text inline or in the module Content settings. You can also style every aspect of this content in the module Design settings and even apply custom CSS to this text in the module Advanced settings.

north York

Your content goes here. Edit or remove this text inline or in the module Content settings. You can also style every aspect of this content in the module Design settings and even apply custom CSS to this text in the module Advanced settings.

Your content goes here. Edit or remove this text inline or in the module Content settings. You can also style every aspect of this content in the module Design settings and even apply custom CSS to this text in the module Advanced settings.

Your content goes here. Edit or remove this text inline or in the module Content settings. You can also style every aspect of this content in the module Design settings and even apply custom CSS to this text in the module Advanced settings.

west end

Your content goes here. Edit or remove this text inline or in the module Content settings. You can also style every aspect of this content in the module Design settings and even apply custom CSS to this text in the module Advanced settings.

Your content goes here. Edit or remove this text inline or in the module Content settings. You can also style every aspect of this content in the module Design settings and even apply custom CSS to this text in the module Advanced settings.

Your content goes here. Edit or remove this text inline or in the module Content settings. You can also style every aspect of this content in the module Design settings and even apply custom CSS to this text in the module Advanced settings.

Etobicoke

Originally part of Etobicoke, Alderwood was “disconnected” from the township with the coming of the QEW in the 1930s; likewise, its ties to Long Branch and New Toronto to the south were checked by the railway that cut through. As such, the neighbourhood has remained relatively insular throughout its growth. But, those who own the low-rise, single-family dwellings are loyal, and they now enjoy fantastic amenities, such as the Alderwood Centre, which houses a community pool, a library and an after-school childcare centre. Alderwood is native for “place where the alder trees grow,” and a fighting spirit to keep the neighbourhood vital—and to care for their own future—seems ingrained in its residents.

Your content goes here. Edit or remove this text inline or in the module Content settings. You can also style every aspect of this content in the module Design settings and even apply custom CSS to this text in the module Advanced settings.

Your content goes here. Edit or remove this text inline or in the module Content settings. You can also style every aspect of this content in the module Design settings and even apply custom CSS to this text in the module Advanced settings.

west end

Your content goes here. Edit or remove this text inline or in the module Content settings. You can also style every aspect of this content in the module Design settings and even apply custom CSS to this text in the module Advanced settings.

Your content goes here. Edit or remove this text inline or in the module Content settings. You can also style every aspect of this content in the module Design settings and even apply custom CSS to this text in the module Advanced settings.

Your content goes here. Edit or remove this text inline or in the module Content settings. You can also style every aspect of this content in the module Design settings and even apply custom CSS to this text in the module Advanced settings.

Etobicoke

AlderWood

Originally part of Etobicoke, Alderwood was “disconnected” from the township with the coming of the QEW in the 1930s; likewise, its ties to Long Branch and New Toronto to the south were checked by the railway that cut through. As such, the neighbourhood has remained relatively insular throughout its growth. But, those who own the low-rise, single-family dwellings are loyal, and they now enjoy fantastic amenities, such as the Alderwood Centre, which houses a community pool, a library and an after-school childcare centre. Alderwood is native for “place where the alder trees grow,” and a fighting spirit to keep the neighbourhood vital—and to care for their own future—seems ingrained in its residents.

Bloorwest Village

A thriving real-estate market and an especially strong business-improvement association (the world’s first, created in 1970) have this idyllic community going stronger than ever. At the centre, a popular shopping stretch along Bloor Street—more than 400 world-class restaurants, specialty stores, coffee shops and more coffee shops—feeds two residential areas: Runnymede to the north, with its two-story brick houses, and Swansea to the south, offering high-end and semi-detached homes, and bungalows. The onslaught of young, affluent families has made larger, more modern renovations a common sight; but, breathing the same fresh air as nearby High Park, the tree-lined streets maintain their rich, natural character. You might say it’s a neighbourhood that’s right fit for a children’s book. True! Lucy Maud Montgomery, author of Anne of Green Gables, lived at 210 Riverside Drive, from 1935 to 1942.

Bridle Path

Canada’s most affluent neighbourhood, The Bridle Path, is legendary for its massive mansions and celebrity fabric. Residents, past and present, include media mogul Moses Znaimer, and recording artists Prince and Celine Dion. The name—a road name that now applies to the entire enclave—arose from the area’s early development plans, which included an elaborate system of equestrian paths for the well-to-do residents. Though it sits within city confines, “secluded” might be the best way to describe it: it’s wrapped by the Don River Valley and lush parklands, and has very few roads passing through.

Cabbagetown

On the eastern edge of downtown rests the Heritage Conservation District of Cabbagetown, named for the late-19th-century Irish immigrants who subsisted on cabbage grown in their front yards. According to the Cabbagetown Preservation Association, the area boasts “the largest continuous area of preserved Victorian housing in North America”—architecture that is wonderfully showcased in the annual Cabbagetown Walking Tours. With solid housing comes proximity to good schools and the TTC; parks aplenty, including Allan Gardens and Riverdale Farm; and countless pubs and restaurants. Of course, a neighbourhood this charming begs to be visited. Torontonians regularly appear on weekends, for a stroll fuelled by lattes and antique shopping.

Etobicoke

Casa Loma-Rathnelly

This dazzling neighbourhood, named for Canada’s most famous castle, is wrapped in beautiful old trees and reaching ravines. In fact, the area remained forested until the early 1900s, with Rathnelly—a picturesque enclave in the southeast corner—promoted on the premise of “great views and natural beauty.” This, along with the castle’s prominence, is what ignited interest, attracting wealthy Torontonians such as Senator John Macdonald and the Eaton family. Still defining the area are Rathnelly’s large Victorians, which date back to the 1880s, and Casa Loma’s mix of Tudor, Georgian, Edwardian and English Cottage homes, built between 1905 and 1940. By foot or by car, residents enjoy a community served by endless amenities: all types of schools, countless unique shops, and the Belt Line recreational trail, which links the entire area with parks. Of course, it’s no secret that Casa Loma is also loved by Hollywood; Chicago, Strange Brew and X-Men are among the movies that have been filmed there. The only thing more pride-inducing than this? The annual “Republic of Rathnelly,” a local celebration that is not to be missed.

Church & Wellsley

It’s a place so dynamic and vibrant that it goes by many names, depending on your source. “Church & Wellesley” say official city representatives. The “Gay Village” say locals. Whatever you call it, this thriving neighbourhood is Toronto’s primary hub for LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual and transsexual) culture. It’s also among the city’s most historic communities, boasting beautiful Victorian houses and apartments that date back to the late-19th century. In addition to countless restaurants and cafés, theatres and nightclubs, the neighbourhood is world-renowned for Pride Week—an annual, 10-day event that attracts upwards of a million people. While public-transit options are plenty, it’s within easy walking distance of many other Toronto hotspots: the Fashion and Theatre Districts, the University of Toronto and Yorkville, Cabbagetown and the St. Lawrence Market.

Corso Italia

“Earlscourt,” as it was once known, was originally settled by British immigrants. In the 1950s, however, a wave of Italian immigrants, as well as residents and merchants from College Street, moved in. Today, the streetscape—bursting with family-run grocery stores and fashion shops, old-world espresso bars and authentic restaurants, and festivals such as the annual Corso Italia Toronto Fiesta—has become the de facto hangout for Italians, whether socializing with friends and relatives or catching a game of bocce in the park. While its distinctive spirit says “countryman for fellow countryman,” everyone is welcome. As long as you cheer for Italy, that is. In 1982, when the country won its last World Cup, some 500,000 people celebrated on the street!

Davisville

At the intersection of Davisville & Yonge, this attractive neighbourhood brings a mix of high-end residential and commercial space. Having Yonge & Eglinton to the north and Yonge & St. Clair to the south—each adding to the available restaurants, shops and amenities—only sweetens the deal. Many of Davisville’s proud, single-family dwellings were built in the 1920s, while the 1970s brought condominium towers, supporting a trend toward higher density. According to a 2006 census, Davisville has a lower percentage of vehicle users than other neighbourhoods; instead, residents rely on TTC and self-propulsion for work and play. But, perhaps there’s a hidden agenda on the part of residents. High pedestrian traffic only makes it more sustainable and safe.

Dovercourt-Wallace-Emerson

Once limited to bakeries and sports bars, Dovercourt is now clearly defined on the city’s excellent dining scene. And, well serviced by subway stations Landsdowne and Dufferin, the area is poised and ready for the influx. North of Bloor is a rich residential area, consisting primarily of single-family dwellings; a large number of former industrial buildings have also been converted into low- and medium-sized apartments and loft condominiums. Adding to the mix are the many shops along Bloor, which serve the ethnically diverse community—comprising Portuguese, Ethiopian, Chinese, Spanish, Italian, Cantonese, Greek, Mandarin, Vietnamese and French subsets.

Downtown Core

If you’re looking to make money, spend money or invest money, then put your money on bustling downtown. As Canada’s financial and cultural hub, it’s home to hundreds of distractions: restaurants and nightclubs, professional-sports venues and tourist attractions, theatres and museums, flagship stores and trendy boutiques. Better yet, in winter, the PATH system lets you access it all without even stepping outside! From towering condos with all the amenities to massive corporate skyscrapers, the daily commute is a breeze. Union Station’s VIA and Toronto Island Airport’s Porter can also whisk you away on a dime, if you’re looking for a weekend away.

Dufferin Grove

This mixed-culture, largely working-class neighbourhood is known for its incredible diversity. And that goes for its residential-commercial divide as well: proud, two- and three-storey semi and detached homes—of Edwardian and Victorian vintage—are quietly interwoven into the bustling business arteries of Bloor, College and Dufferin. Dufferin Grove Park is the largest green space in the area, bringing playground facilities, an ice-hockey rink, an organic farmers’ market, and a go-to community hub. In fact, “park as local treasure” may be an understatement. Its protector-support group, Friends of Dufferin Grove Park, is especially enthusiastic!

East York-The Danforth

East York was founded as an English, working-class neighbourhood; people who moved here were delighted to own a small, lawn-accented home. Over the years, it has matured into a thriving, diverse community, with schools in every direction, and an abundance of youth sports programs—from hockey to figure skating, basketball to soccer, tennis to gymnastics. On the western reaches is Upper Broadview–Playter Estates: the northern section is becoming increasingly popular with artists and business professionals, who treasure the proximity to downtown; in Playter Estates, home prices are affordable, but skew to the upper-middle class. Overall, East York is quiet and friendly, and without the flash of other like-minded neighbourhoods. But, at any time, residents can pay a visit to nearby “Greektown.” This always-bustling stretch along the Danforth offers endless authentic Mediterranean restaurants and cafés, and exciting annual festivals, such as “Taste of the Danforth.”

AlderWood

Originally part of Etobicoke, Alderwood was “disconnected” from the township with the coming of the QEW in the 1930s; likewise, its ties to Long Branch and New Toronto to the south were checked by the railway that cut through. As such, the neighbourhood has remained relatively insular throughout its growth. But, those who own the low-rise, single-family dwellings are loyal, and they now enjoy fantastic amenities, such as the Alderwood Centre, which houses a community pool, a library and an after-school childcare centre. Alderwood is native for “place where the alder trees grow,” and a fighting spirit to keep the neighbourhood vital—and to care for their own future—seems ingrained in its residents.

AlderWood

Originally part of Etobicoke, Alderwood was “disconnected” from the township with the coming of the QEW in the 1930s; likewise, its ties to Long Branch and New Toronto to the south were checked by the railway that cut through. As such, the neighbourhood has remained relatively insular throughout its growth. But, those who own the low-rise, single-family dwellings are loyal, and they now enjoy fantastic amenities, such as the Alderwood Centre, which houses a community pool, a library and an after-school childcare centre. Alderwood is native for “place where the alder trees grow,” and a fighting spirit to keep the neighbourhood vital—and to care for their own future—seems ingrained in its residents.

AlderWood

Originally part of Etobicoke, Alderwood was “disconnected” from the township with the coming of the QEW in the 1930s; likewise, its ties to Long Branch and New Toronto to the south were checked by the railway that cut through. As such, the neighbourhood has remained relatively insular throughout its growth. But, those who own the low-rise, single-family dwellings are loyal, and they now enjoy fantastic amenities, such as the Alderwood Centre, which houses a community pool, a library and an after-school childcare centre. Alderwood is native for “place where the alder trees grow,” and a fighting spirit to keep the neighbourhood vital—and to care for their own future—seems ingrained in its residents.

AlderWood

Originally part of Etobicoke, Alderwood was “disconnected” from the township with the coming of the QEW in the 1930s; likewise, its ties to Long Branch and New Toronto to the south were checked by the railway that cut through. As such, the neighbourhood has remained relatively insular throughout its growth. But, those who own the low-rise, single-family dwellings are loyal, and they now enjoy fantastic amenities, such as the Alderwood Centre, which houses a community pool, a library and an after-school childcare centre. Alderwood is native for “place where the alder trees grow,” and a fighting spirit to keep the neighbourhood vital—and to care for their own future—seems ingrained in its residents.

AlderWood

Originally part of Etobicoke, Alderwood was “disconnected” from the township with the coming of the QEW in the 1930s; likewise, its ties to Long Branch and New Toronto to the south were checked by the railway that cut through. As such, the neighbourhood has remained relatively insular throughout its growth. But, those who own the low-rise, single-family dwellings are loyal, and they now enjoy fantastic amenities, such as the Alderwood Centre, which houses a community pool, a library and an after-school childcare centre. Alderwood is native for “place where the alder trees grow,” and a fighting spirit to keep the neighbourhood vital—and to care for their own future—seems ingrained in its residents.

AlderWood

Originally part of Etobicoke, Alderwood was “disconnected” from the township with the coming of the QEW in the 1930s; likewise, its ties to Long Branch and New Toronto to the south were checked by the railway that cut through. As such, the neighbourhood has remained relatively insular throughout its growth. But, those who own the low-rise, single-family dwellings are loyal, and they now enjoy fantastic amenities, such as the Alderwood Centre, which houses a community pool, a library and an after-school childcare centre. Alderwood is native for “place where the alder trees grow,” and a fighting spirit to keep the neighbourhood vital—and to care for their own future—seems ingrained in its residents.

AlderWood

Originally part of Etobicoke, Alderwood was “disconnected” from the township with the coming of the QEW in the 1930s; likewise, its ties to Long Branch and New Toronto to the south were checked by the railway that cut through. As such, the neighbourhood has remained relatively insular throughout its growth. But, those who own the low-rise, single-family dwellings are loyal, and they now enjoy fantastic amenities, such as the Alderwood Centre, which houses a community pool, a library and an after-school childcare centre. Alderwood is native for “place where the alder trees grow,” and a fighting spirit to keep the neighbourhood vital—and to care for their own future—seems ingrained in its residents.

AlderWood

Originally part of Etobicoke, Alderwood was “disconnected” from the township with the coming of the QEW in the 1930s; likewise, its ties to Long Branch and New Toronto to the south were checked by the railway that cut through. As such, the neighbourhood has remained relatively insular throughout its growth. But, those who own the low-rise, single-family dwellings are loyal, and they now enjoy fantastic amenities, such as the Alderwood Centre, which houses a community pool, a library and an after-school childcare centre. Alderwood is native for “place where the alder trees grow,” and a fighting spirit to keep the neighbourhood vital—and to care for their own future—seems ingrained in its residents.

AlderWood

Originally part of Etobicoke, Alderwood was “disconnected” from the township with the coming of the QEW in the 1930s; likewise, its ties to Long Branch and New Toronto to the south were checked by the railway that cut through. As such, the neighbourhood has remained relatively insular throughout its growth. But, those who own the low-rise, single-family dwellings are loyal, and they now enjoy fantastic amenities, such as the Alderwood Centre, which houses a community pool, a library and an after-school childcare centre. Alderwood is native for “place where the alder trees grow,” and a fighting spirit to keep the neighbourhood vital—and to care for their own future—seems ingrained in its residents.

AlderWood

Originally part of Etobicoke, Alderwood was “disconnected” from the township with the coming of the QEW in the 1930s; likewise, its ties to Long Branch and New Toronto to the south were checked by the railway that cut through. As such, the neighbourhood has remained relatively insular throughout its growth. But, those who own the low-rise, single-family dwellings are loyal, and they now enjoy fantastic amenities, such as the Alderwood Centre, which houses a community pool, a library and an after-school childcare centre. Alderwood is native for “place where the alder trees grow,” and a fighting spirit to keep the neighbourhood vital—and to care for their own future—seems ingrained in its residents.